Why I Believe in Non-Intervention | Back Home Again: Why I Believe in Non-Intervention

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Why I Believe in Non-Intervention

April is Cesarean Awareness Month, so I thought I would share with you something that was posted on one of the VBAC boards I belong to. I was bawling after I watched this and it is the epitome of why I don't believe in unnecessary birth interventions, which contrary to what some have taken away from previous posts, I was educated about before my son's birth - unfortunately I didn't have the right support team.



I will always wonder "what if" with Ewan's birth and be so grateful that I found the strength to switch providers and go for a VBAC when I had so many people telling me I was nuts to do so. Seeing the part where she missed her children meeting for the first time just breaks my heart because that is one of my favorite memories, when Ewan and Cecily met for the first time.

I know that not everyone wants a natural birth, but please please do your own research and not listen blindly to your doctor. As much as I hate to say it, they don't always have your best interests at heart. While some c-sections are necessary and life saving, the recommended WHO c-section rate is around 15%. The rate in the US is 32.8% and the majority of those are not necessary, or only became necessary due to unnecessary interventions/inductions. Trust me, you don't want to be in the position of having to fight for your right to birth the way you want.

14 comments:

  1. I will have to watch the video later because I have a feeling it would be upsetting, but I know that seeing Anya meet Felix was such an awesome moment, as was the first time I met both my little ones. I think there are OB's out there who don't have their patients' best interests in mind, but I think many of them are also operating out of "fear" and are not practicing according to evidence-based practice. And if you know anything about healthcare, you know that evidence-based practice is a big deal these days. The ACOG is now saying that inducing a woman because she is carrying what a doctor deems to be a "big" baby is not a reason for induction (or a c section), but doctors are still recommending these women be induced, which many times results in a c section. There are also numerous studies showing that VBACs aren't as risky as they were once believed to be, but yet doctors don't always want to offer them to their patients unless they are asked, and even then it is a struggle to get a trial of labor. I understand why some people would choose a c section in certain situations (even if I wouldn't choose it in the same situations), but I still wish that doctors would also disclose the risks of having a c section, because they aren't any better than the risks associated with VBACs.

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  2. I cannot even begin to tell you the number of times someone posts a "risk of VBAC" consent form that lists all these risks, yet there isn't a "risk of c-section/repeat c-section" form. It's ridiculous.

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  3. I'm pretty sure the WHO has admitted that one person just made up the 15% rule, and that no one really knows the best rate. Overall rate doesn't really matter, as long as each woman is getting what is best for her and her baby. I wonder what role increased maternal age and maternal obesity is playing in the c-section rates these days.

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  4. Actually no, they recommend that it be between 10-15%. I highly recommend visiting the International Cesarean Awareness Network's website as well as the WHO site, ImprovingBirth.org and evidencebasedbirth.com. Especially if you plan on having (more) children!

    http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/85/10/06-039289/en/
    http://www.improvingbirth.org/the-evidence-shows/

    These are just several articles out there but there are plenty more. And unfortunately there are so many women out there that aren't getting the best care for them or their baby. I hate to break it to you, but there are so many doctors out there that don't practice evidence based care. As was stated in a previous comment, many operate out of fear, which results in not the best outcomes for women and baby and sets mom up for the rest of her reproductive life.

    It's so sad to me because so many women are lied to about the reasons for their c-sections and are told that they will never birth vaginally. Bull crap. Almost always a woman will not make a baby she cannot birth. Our bodies were made for this and are not broken. My c-section was due to a cascade of interventions, poor position and failure to wait. I was told that I would never birth vaginally because my son was "big" at 8lbs8oz and something must be wrong with my pelvis. However, I vbac'd my 9lb8oz daughter after I was left alone and had the opportunity to labor my way, without intervention.

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  5. http://www.cesareanrates.com/blog/2013/1/8/world-health-organizations-15-percent-cesarean-rate-recommen.html The WHO admits there is "is no empirical evidence for an optimum percentage or range of percentages" and that "Ultimately, what matters most is that all women who need caesarean sections actually receive them."

    Historically, women and babies died in incredible numbers - and I know people try to dismiss this as "the doctors didn't wash their hands" but the historical record doesn't support that.

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  6. You're right. Women have died in large numbers during childbirth historically. And many of us probably wouldn't be alive today if we had given birth way back when. But, the fact of the matter is that there are so many women out there that are given unnecessary cesareans because their provider didn't leave them alone or give them the time needed.

    I don't have time to argue with someone I've never met from the internet. But, it sounds like you're a little defensive because you might have bought into all this crap doctors are spouting....just sayin'...

    If that makes you feel better about yourself, then great! But don't go on my blog and spout your hate because you have issues with your children's births. I have enough issues of my own and don't need your negativity.

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  7. if I ever have a kid, I want a vagional birth all the way!

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  8. I am actually so grateful that in South Africa natural birth is so encouraged! I fully believe in choice and have friends who choose to have a c section but I praise God that I was able to have normal births!! With Lil Mister it was long, 26 hours medication free but at the end it was so worth it!

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  9. My c-section was because of a cascade of interventions due to failure to wait. At that point that it happened, he wasn't coming out vaginally but if they had left me alone to labor and for him to move into position, I have no doubt in my mind that we would've done it. It's so unfortunate that pregnancy and birth is viewed as a medical condition in this country that needs to be "cured."

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  10. Hopefully my posts will serve to educate and empower you for the future!

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  11. I completely agree--I think that, no matter what, all moms-to-be should be informed of ALL options. That way, you can choose the best option for you--not your doctor, not your best friend, not your mom. I ended up having to have one of those emergency c-sections, and I wasn't at all prepared for it. In fact, I had purposefully refused to learn about the process because I was SO set on a natural birth. While I'm not happy about having a c-section, I think I would have been less traumatized by the entire experience if I'd done more research ahead of time.


    If we ever have another child (which would be difficult after the trauma of Britton's birth experience), I would definitely look at ALL of my options, including a natural VBAC, since it's close to what I originally wanted. I think birth is such a powerful experience and every mom-to-be needs to deal with it in the best way that she can. Great post!!!!

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  12. Ewan's birth was traumatic for me, it just took me until I was pregnant again to realize how much so. Every pregnancy, birth and baby is different. I knew that I wanted another baby, even though I figured that birth was probably going to wind up as a repeat. Surprise! I wouldn't say that it was healing, but it was definitely amazing.

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  13. Continuing to bring awareness to Cesarean's will inevitably empower more Moms to turn away interventions, or so I think. I feel there are a lot of "uneducated" women when it comes to the details of birth, interventions, risks, etc. and they trust their OB's to educate them properly which is not always the case. Some Drs (in my opinion) want to "get it over with" and not play the guessing game by scheduling inductions/c-sections and it has usually has nothing to do with the health of the child or mom, not all but some. I have also formed the opinion that they call on interventions, inducements, c-sections because they cost more money which in turn puts more money in their pocket. It's absolutely ludicrous and it won't change unless more women stand up for their rights and DEMAND things to change. I *high five* you for being an advocate for Cesarean Awareness and encouraging women to become educated and empowered. Kudos <3

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  14. You are so right that in some cases interventions/c-sections are used because of the insurance money. I have never voiced this before, but I sometimes think that everything that was pushed on me because of Ewan's birth was because we were at a hospital in one of the poorest areas around Philly that relies largely on Medicaid and we had super awesome insurance that paid for everything.

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